i Series (Non ANDROID)

Nextel, Boost Mobile and SouthernLinc

Question

    thebat
    i365 Rubber Ducky Antenna InstallAnswered
    Question posted July 16, 2011 by thebatTelegraph , last edited December 22, 2011
    1112 Views, 15 Comments
    Question Title:
    i365 Rubber Ducky Antenna Install
    Comment:

    Can anyone tell me how to do this or who will do it for me?

    Thanks,

    thebat

    Best Answer

    idenrocks

    Once you have the "rubber ducky" antenna, it is easy to change it, and you do NOT have to take the phone apart. At the bottom I pasted two links where you can buy the i325 replacement antenna, which fits fine (and might even be the same part number as the one for the i365 anyway).

    Someplace where the lighting is good (or use a flashlight), pull up the factory (extendable) antenna all the way and look down into the socket. You should see a black ring on the sides of the socket and a shiny metal bottom of the socket. Look carefully at the black ring, note there are two shallow vertical grooves in the sidewalls of the black ring. (see photo below)

    Get a flat-blade screwdriver that fits nicely into those slots, so the blade just a tiny bit narrower than the slots so you can fit it in all the way to the bottom of the socket. Align the flat blade with both slots and tilt the screwdriver just slightly, so you obtain a good, solid wedging action between the screwdriver & the slots. (see photo below) Don't jam the driver in too hard, or you might wreck the phone, or you might make it harder to unscrew the extendable antenna if you're pushing sideways too hard.

    While applying moderate pressure downward and towards one of the slots in the sidewall (i.e. pushing down at the angle of tilt of the driver), turn the driver slowly and watch to make sure the black ring is turning with the screwdriver. If it is not turning, you'll have to find a better-fitting screwdriver, or push a bit harder so the blade digs a bit more into the plastic black ring, so you can apply enough torque to the ring to unscrew it.

    Once you have the ring completely unscrewed, you'll see a brass threaded insert at the bottom of the antenna socket if the i365 (see photo below). Just thread your new antenna into that threaded hole, grip the very base of the rubber antenna with your fingertips and tighten it down all the way.

    BTW, I was able to purchase the genuine Motorola OEM part from CPR Technology at this website:

    http://www.nexnow.com/nextel-i325-antenna.html

    I couldn't find it under the i365 accessories, but the one that fits the i325 seems to be the same part, and mine installed easily and works fine.

    I didn't buy anything from the following website, but here is another website that has what they claim is OEM quality replacement antennas. I have no reason to doubt them, but neither can I personally vouch for them:

    http://yesofcourse.com/i325replacementantennaoem.aspx

    Below are a few photos that might help clarify the instructions above.

    Good luck!

              -- iDENrocks
    IMG_0453.jpg

    https://forums.motorola.com/files/118002c43b/IMG_0454.jpg

    IMG_0456.jpg

    IMG_0457.jpg

    Answer

     

    • AlphaDog

      I have not experience with this, but i did find this thread:

      http://community.sprint.com/baw/thread/22371

    • idenrocks

      This link doesn't answer your question specifically, but some of the info might be useful anyway. One poster in that thread says it takes a Torx T6 driver to get the plastic phone halves apart, if your phone does not already have the threaded antenna port built in:

      http://www.howardforums.com/showthread.php/1557335-rubber-duckie-antenna

      Sometimes my browser won't open the HowardForums pages, but you can always Google "howardforums 1557335" and use the Google cache of that forum thread.

      It is rather frustrating that it is so difficult to even FIND a rubber antenna for Nextel/Moto i325/i365/etc.

      You might try searching for info on the i365is (is = "intrinsically safe"), because it comes only with the rubberized antenna.

      I noticed that SoutherLinc's website sells the i365is for $279:

      https://onlinestore.southernlinc.com/prod_details.aspx?pid=1108

      SouthernLinc GTA offers it for $249: http://gta.southernlinc.com/phones/motorola_i365is.aspx

      And here is the user guide for the i65/i365is at SouthernLinc:

      http://www.southernlinc.com/Assets/documents/phones/i365UserGuide.pdf

      Good luck, and be sure to post back here with your results, or any additional info you uncover during your quest.

    • idenrocks

      Once you have the "rubber ducky" antenna, it is easy to change it, and you do NOT have to take the phone apart. At the bottom I pasted two links where you can buy the i325 replacement antenna, which fits fine (and might even be the same part number as the one for the i365 anyway).

      Someplace where the lighting is good (or use a flashlight), pull up the factory (extendable) antenna all the way and look down into the socket. You should see a black ring on the sides of the socket and a shiny metal bottom of the socket. Look carefully at the black ring, note there are two shallow vertical grooves in the sidewalls of the black ring. (see photo below)

      Get a flat-blade screwdriver that fits nicely into those slots, so the blade just a tiny bit narrower than the slots so you can fit it in all the way to the bottom of the socket. Align the flat blade with both slots and tilt the screwdriver just slightly, so you obtain a good, solid wedging action between the screwdriver & the slots. (see photo below) Don't jam the driver in too hard, or you might wreck the phone, or you might make it harder to unscrew the extendable antenna if you're pushing sideways too hard.

      While applying moderate pressure downward and towards one of the slots in the sidewall (i.e. pushing down at the angle of tilt of the driver), turn the driver slowly and watch to make sure the black ring is turning with the screwdriver. If it is not turning, you'll have to find a better-fitting screwdriver, or push a bit harder so the blade digs a bit more into the plastic black ring, so you can apply enough torque to the ring to unscrew it.

      Once you have the ring completely unscrewed, you'll see a brass threaded insert at the bottom of the antenna socket if the i365 (see photo below). Just thread your new antenna into that threaded hole, grip the very base of the rubber antenna with your fingertips and tighten it down all the way.

      BTW, I was able to purchase the genuine Motorola OEM part from CPR Technology at this website:

      http://www.nexnow.com/nextel-i325-antenna.html

      I couldn't find it under the i365 accessories, but the one that fits the i325 seems to be the same part, and mine installed easily and works fine.

      I didn't buy anything from the following website, but here is another website that has what they claim is OEM quality replacement antennas. I have no reason to doubt them, but neither can I personally vouch for them:

      http://yesofcourse.com/i325replacementantennaoem.aspx

      Below are a few photos that might help clarify the instructions above.

      Good luck!

                -- iDENrocks
      IMG_0453.jpg

      https://forums.motorola.com/files/118002c43b/IMG_0454.jpg

      IMG_0456.jpg

      IMG_0457.jpg

    • idenrocks
      Attaching file "IMG_0454.jpg" (34KB)
    • idenrocks
      Attaching file "IMG_0456.jpg" (31KB)
    • idenrocks
      Attaching file "IMG_0457.jpg" (43KB)
    • glennc6

      I followed these instructions and had the antennas on both of my i365 phones changed in less than ten minutes.

      Message was edited by: glennc6

    • idenrocks

      glennc6,

      Glad to hear the instructions worked well for you.

      I'm envious that you're in SouthernLINC territory, so you can continue using iDEN even after Sprint kills Nextel in 2013.

      Good luck!

         - iDENrocks

    • glennc6

      By using the i365 phones with the rubber duck antennas in the SouthernLINC network, I can now make and receive voice calls and actually carry on a conversation without having the call dropped.  This is in places that I couldn't even get a text message to go through with Verizon Wireless.  Verizon was great when I travelled nation-wide, but now working in rural areas in SE Mississippi 90% of the time, SouthernLINC rules!

      So Sprint is completely doing away with Nextel?  That's a shame.  I wonder if SouthernLINC will take advantage and possibly expand their territory.

    • idenrocks

      I have found that even though my i580 is a very good phone, the i365 with rubber ducky antenna is significantly better at not only holding calls, but the i365 has much better sound quality in fringe areas. In areas of low signal, the i580 routinely drops a few syllables or words or has momentarily poor audio quality (fuzzy, "cyborg" sounding), whereas so far my i365 with rubber ducky antenna has never dropped syllables or words or had fuzzy audio. Being a bulky bar phone with fixed antenna, it is less convenient size-wise, but the increased performance is absolutely worth it in my situation. I wouldn't trade my i365 for any other phone in existence today.

      Yes, Sprint will begin shutting down the Nextel Nationwide iDEN network beginning in 2013, with plans to kill it completely by the end of 2013 (sooner, if they can). They have already been cutting back the 850 MHz iDEN bandwidth on some towers and giving it over to their CDMA network, and I believe I read that some of the 850 MHz iDEN spectrum will eventually go to their proposed new LTE network buildout. So those of us still using Nextel or Boost iDEN only have another 12-18 months of iDEN service before Sprint pulls the iDEN plug completely.

      From what I've heard so far, the new Sprint CDMA Direct Connect is better than Qchat, but the Sprint DC coverage at this time is pretty dismal compared to iDEN coverage. The new Sprint DC requires that the CDMA tower equipment has been upgraded to EVDO rev A, but much of Sprint's CDMA network is still at 1X, which means Sprint DC will not work well (perhaps not at all in 1X areas with weak signal) until Sprint upgrades their entire CDMA network to EVDO rev A. Supposedly, that is what Sprint's "Network Vision" is all about, but that is a massive overhaul of their network, and it will take a couple of years to complete it (if indeed they ever do complete it, which based on Sprint's history is not likely). Sprint's CDMA network is already having a lot of trouble coping with all the smartphones with their huge data loads, so all in all the two-year horizon for Sprint Direct Connect on CDMA looks rather bleak and iffy.

      Enjoy your time with SouthernLINC, and hope that they manage to upgrade their iDEN system with the latest Motorola Harmony system to keep it viable for a few more years, rather than abandon iDEN entirely and let it waste away like Sprint did for Nextel.

    • AlphaDog
      
      

      idenrocks wrote:

      Sprint's CDMA network is already having a lot of trouble coping with all the smartphones with their huge data loads, so all in all the two-year horizon for Sprint Direct Connect on CDMA looks rather bleak and iffy.

      All the people i know on Sprint claim that their data network shows great performance. Especially in iPhone saturated areas - they claim that they are seeing great download speeds. I am AT&T myself, but your statement does not match what I see from others on Sprint.

    • idenrocks

      I based that particular comment not only on the various recent online articles about Sprint iPhone users complaining about connection speeds, but also based on the many, many comments following the articles (see quote and first link below), as well as the thread on Sprint's own Community website which indicates many different models of Sprint smartphone have slow data/connection speeds (see second link below).

      Of course, that feedback on Sprint's iPhone is skewed, because people with a grievance will post those grievances, whereas customers not having issues will remain largely silent. So while that feedback is not scientifically sound, it is definitely out there, which probably means something bad is going on somewhere in Sprint CDMA land. If you believe those posters who have had Sprint's non-iPhone smartphones for the past year or more, the Sprint CDMA network has had, and still does have, significant problems with data speeds when the entire network as a whole is considered.

      

      Also, my own six years of being a Sprint customer (since they took over Nextel) has shown that Sprint's execution of network upgrades & implementation has thus far been very poorly done. They never implemented Qchat properly, so that fizzled out. They never finished EVDO upgrade to their own native CDMA network, while Verizon completed that upgrade years ago, so many Sprint CDMA customers throughout the US still have very slow connection speeds on 3G. And Sprint faltered badly on the 4G WiMax buildout; we all know now that Sprint is in the process of abandoning WiMax for LTE, which has left those early WiMax customers effectively stranded on the small islands of WiMax that exist in the US to date. Furthermore, I have read a handful of online articles directly comparing Sprint's WiMax connnection speeds to those of Verizon's LTE and T-mobile's HSPA+, and in most (but not all) of those online comparisons, Sprint's WiMax performance fell to either second or third place. Fundamentally, it all points to Sprint's network Operations group being "zero-for-three" when it comes to network performance, upgrades & implementation.

      My point, based on my own personal experience as a Sprint-Nextel customer for six years now, combined with the hundreds of postings form other Sprint customers, and reading article after article on Sprint's botched implementations relative to their networks, was that it gives me zero hope that the new Sprint Direct Connect will be implemented satisfactorily. That is the point I was making to the SouthernLINC customer to whom I was replying.

      Below are a couple of links supporting my comment that Sprint is by now well known for always being second-rate or third-rate when it comes to network performance overall. There is more out there, so if you don't trust the sources I cite below, go right ahead and do your own research. I have done more than enough research to support my own commments and on which to form my own opinions of Sprint's performance.

      http://www.phonearena.com/news/Sprint-still-looking-for-a-solution-to-the-iPhone-4S-speed-issue-having-troubles-replicating-it_id23447

      "Shortly after it hit the market, a growing number of Sprint iPhone 4S owners started reporting dramatically slow 3G speeds when accessing the web from their smartphone."

      and

      http://community.sprint.com/baw/thread/78766?tstart=0

    • idenrocks

      Follow-up to previous post, giving further proof that Sprint indeed did have genuine problems with iPhones on the Sprint 3G CDMA network:

      http://www.phonearena.com/news/Sprint-tackles-iPhone-4S-issues-with-network-enhancements_id24274

    • vietnam.vet

      Crazy question, but let me ask:  Does anyone know of a connector that will adapt the i365 for use with an external antenna through the TOP of the phone instead of the antenna jack inside the back cover (just above the battery)?

      Does anyone know what type of base is installed in the top of the phone (where the OEM antenna is screwed in)?

      Any info would be appreciated.

      VV

    • idenrocks

      V V:

      Not sure I completely understand your question, but if you scroll up about halfway to the post with the detailed antenna swap-out instructions and the four photos, you can see exactly how to get to the external antenna connection (see second to last photo showing the brass threaded insert at the bottom of the gray plastic antenna socket).

      I don't know for certain the specific thread callout of that brass threaded insert, but regardless of whether it is inch-sized or metric-sized, it is definitely a fine or extra-fine pitch thread. If I was forced to make a guess, I would guess it is a metric fine thread, probably M5x0.5 mm. If it is an inch-sized thread, I would guess it might be a #10x56 or a #10x64, which are very unusual, maybe even custom or special threads. But given that Motorola is a sophisticated, international company, I would guess it is probably an M5x0.5 mm thread.

      You can always spend the $15 or so to buy an external rubber-ducky antenna (sources given in the same antenna installation instructions post above) and take it to a machine shop and they can tell you exactly what the thread size & pitch are, either using a thread-gauge, or putting it under a toolmaker's microscope and measuring the thread pitch that way.

          Good luck!

              - iDENrocks